How to Make Blackberry Syrup (Canning Recipe)

Learn how to make homemade blackberry syrup the easy way with minimal mess. These simple instructions and ingredients will yield a delicious canned blackberry syrup you can use in tea, over pancakes, waffles, or in an Italian soda. Read on for the no-fuss blackberry syrup recipe and learn how to can blackberry syrup to store on your pantry shelves and enjoy throughout the year.

canned blackberry syrup Pinterest image

An Abundance of Fresh Blackberries

Where I live, in Oregon, blackberries grow wild along roadsides and ditches. Many people spend time cutting back blackberry bushes and vines because they are so abundant and can be rather invasive. Some people are surprised that blackberry plants are considered pests, but that’s the way it is around here. Despite their aggressive and prickly nature, ripe blackberries are delicious. If you wear long sleeves and are prepared for the thorns, your blackberry-picking efforts can pay off in many scrumptious ways. Berry cobbler recipes, berry pies, berry jam, and berry gelato are just a few of the recipes that can be adjusted to include blackberries. Just take your favorite berry recipe and use blackberries for a marvelous taste experience. That’s what I did to make this home canning blackberry syrup recipe. I just adapted my favorite home-canned raspberry syrup creation to use blackberries instead. Let’s get started with learning how to make blackberry syrup from fresh blackberries.

***Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases at no additional cost to you.*** Already know what you’d like to get from Amazon? Here’s a handy way to get to the website, linked to one of my favorite books about berries. Just click on the link, then browse around and do your shopping.

Take Me To Amazon!

Equipment Needed for Canning Blackberry Syrup

One unfortunate thing about blackberries is that there are a lot of seeds. These can easily be strained out after cooking if you have the right tools. In order to strain out the seeds, you will need one important piece of equipment: a fine-mesh sieve. Here’s a great, inexpensive set.

Other Equipment

Of course, you do not have to can this blackberry syrup. If you reduce the quantity, you may just want to store the syrup in the refrigerator. The full recipe makes about six half-pints, so here is the equipment you need to assemble beforehand. You will need:

A large mixing bowl

6 half-pint canning jars, lids and bands 

A large boiling water bath canner

 

A small metal saucepan with lid (for heating the jar lids)

A medium-sized saucepan to collect the syrup when seeds are removed

A large, non-reactive stockpot (for mixing the syrup)

1 set of canning tools (optional, but these sure have made canning easier and a lot less messy) 

 

Preparation

Set six canning bands (some call them rings) aside, near where you will be filling the jars. 

Place the six glass jars in the water bath canner. The water should cover the jars by at least an inch. When you are ready to start cooking the syrup (see below), turn the heat to medium-high.

Place six jar lids in the small saucepan with enough water to cover the lids. When you are ready to start cooking the syrup (see below), cover the pan and heat the water on low. I’ve always been told not to let the water come to a boil. Now it’s time to make the blackberry syrup!

Ingredients for the Canned Blackberry Syrup Recipe

8 cups fresh or frozen blackberries

6 cups sugar (you can add less sugar, but your syrup will not be as thick and may be tart)

2/3 cups lemon juice (juice from about 3 lemons and fresh is definitely best)

1 cup water (for thicker syrup, add less water)

Directions for the Easy Canned Blackberry Syrup Recipe

Rinse and drain the blackberries. In a large mixing bowl, combine the blackberries, lemon juice, water, and sugar. (Quick tip: To get the most out of your fresh lemons, use a zester to collect the lemon zest before slicing lemons in half for juicing. I freeze the lemon zest in a small container for use in other recipes.)

 

Let the bowl sit at room temperature for at least two hours. I sometimes let the berries sit all day. This helps the sugar to dissolve.

When you are ready to start making the syrup, put the jars in the canner to heat and begin heating the lids in a pan of water on the stove. Scrape the blackberry mixture into a large stockpot or skillet and begin heating over medium-high heat. How do you thicken berry syrup? The secret to the success of this recipe is cooking the blackberry mixture over high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, and boil for six minutes.

boiling blackberries for canned blackberry syrup

Separating the Seeds

How do you extract juice from blackberries? Now that the blackberries have been cooked, most of the seeds have separated from the berries and will be floating on top of the mixture. To separate the seeds from the liquid syrup with no mess, have the fine-mesh sieve placed over a medium saucepan. Pour the hot syrup into the sieve. Press the seeds with a wooden spoon and move them around to make sure the holes in the mesh are not blocked. The liquid will drain into the saucepan. I usually spend 3-5 minutes pushing the blackberry seeds around in the sieve to collect as much liquid as possible in the saucepan.

canned blackberry syrup in the sieve

Let the syrup continue dripping into the saucepan while you get the hot jars in place. When the dripping has stopped, set the mushy seed mixture aside. (The seed mixture is delicious on toast or on top of ice cream. Our chickens also enjoy it.) Note: This seed separation works even if you are just trying to extract juice from blackberries for blackberry juice. Can I juice blackberries? Yes. The key is heating the berries to separate the seeds, whether you add sugar or not. 

Filling the Jars

Using tongs, if you have them, lift hot jars out of hot water. I usually place mine in the sink. Next to the sink, I place my trusty wooden breadboard. You can use a cutting board or something similar to protect your counter. Put the saucepan of hot syrup on the board and place it next to the jars. Ladle hot syrup into jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Once all jars are filled, wipe jar rims. Place lids on jars and place bands on jars. Adjust until they are fingertip tight.

Processing the Filled Jars

Place jars (using a jar-lifter, if you have one) in the hot water bath in the canner. Water should cover the jars by at least one inch. Bring the water to a boil and process the jars for 15 minutes, adjusting for altitude. When processing is done, remove the jars (again using a jar-lifter, if you have one) and place them on a towel to absorb the drips and to cool.

Checking the Seal

If all has gone as it should, you should hear the jars seal as they cool. When they are cool, press the center of each lid. They should not flex. Label and store the jars in a cool, dry place. The quality is best if used within one year. Refrigerate any jars once opened. Now you know how to make blackberry syrup for drinks and other items. Enjoy your homemade blackberry syrup over ice cream, pancakes, waffles, in tea, or mixed with sparkling water for an Italian soda. Mmmm, delicious!

Easy Canned Blackberry Syrup Recipe

Learn how to can delicious blackberry syrup to use on pancakes, waffles, in tea and more.
5 from 5 votes
Prep Time 2 hrs
Cook Time 25 mins
Course Condiment
Cuisine American
Servings 6 half-pints
Calories 40 kcal

Equipment

  • Large boiling water bath canner
  • 6 half-pint canning jars, lids and bands
  • a large skillet
  • 1 set of canning tools (optional)
  • 1 small and 1 medium saucepan
  • Fine mesh strainer

Ingredients
  

  • 8 cups fresh or frozen blackberries
  • 6 cups sugar
  • cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 cup water

Instructions
 

  • Rinse and drain the blackberries. In a large mixing bowl, combine the blackberries, lemon juice, water, and sugar.
  • Let the bowl sit at room temperature for at least two hours. I sometimes let the berries sit all day. This helps the sugar to dissolve.
  • When you are ready to start making the syrup, put the jars in the canner to heat and begin heating the lids in a pan of water on the stove. 
  • Scrape the blackberry mixture into a large stockpot or skillet and begin heating over medium-high heat.
  • Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, and boil for six minutes.
  • To separate the seeds from the liquid syrup with no mess, have the fine-mesh sieve placed over a medium saucepan. Pour the hot syrup into the sieve. Press the seeds with a wooden spoon and move them around to make sure the holes in the mesh are not blocked. The liquid will drain into the saucepan. I usually spend 3-5 minutes pushing the blackberry seeds around in the sieve to collect as much liquid as possible in the saucepan.
  • Let the syrup continue dripping into the saucepan while you get the hot jars in place. When the dripping has stopped, set the mushy seed mixture aside. 
  • Using tongs, if you have them, lift hot jars out of hot water. I usually place mine in the sink. Next to the sink, I place my trusty wooden breadboard. You can use a cutting board or something similar to protect your counter. Put the saucepan of hot syrup on the board and place it next to the jars.
  • Ladle hot syrup into jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Once all jars are filled, wipe jar rims. Place lids on jars and place bands on jars. Adjust until they are fingertip tight.
  • Place jars (using a jar-lifter, if you have one) in the hot water bath in the canner. Water should cover the jars by at least one inch. Bring the water to a boil and process the jars for 15 minutes, adjusting for altitude.
  • When processing is done, remove the jars (again using a jar-lifter, if you have one) and place them on a towel to absorb the drips and to cool.
  • f all has gone as it should, you should hear the jars seal as they cool. When they are cool, press the center of each lid. They should not flex. Label and store the jars in a cool, dry place. The quality is best if used within one year. Refrigerate any jars once opened.

Notes

There are about 40 calories in a tablespoon serving of this recipe for blackberry syrup.
Keyword berries, canning, easy recipes

Tips for Freezing Blackberries

Freezing blackberries is a good way to ensure you will be able to enjoy blackberry goodness all year long. The fruit is delicate, so here is my favorite trick for freezing them. Place them in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze. When they are frozen, place them in a zipped plastic storage bag and put the bag in the freezer. The berries will not stick together and will be easy to use in future recipes. This trick also works well with raspberries.

How Long Does Homemade Syrup Last?

According to the chart on the USDA Shelf-Stable Food Safety page, any home-canned food should be eaten within 12 months for optimum quality. Once your blackberry syrup is opened, the product should be used within 5 to 7 days.

Ready to Try This Recipe for Canned Blackberry Syrup?

Now you know how to preserve homemade blackberry syrup, are you ready to try canning blackberry syrup on your own? If you make this blackberry syrup recipe, feel free to send a photo. I’d enjoy seeing the results. What do you like to use blackberry syrup for?

More Kitchen Inspiration

It’s always nice to have a plan when it comes to meals. If you’re looking for a way to get more organized with your meal planning efforts, I’ve got something for you. Free, editable meal planners! The templates can be used over and over, as often as you need them. You can make as many duplicates as you like, and you’ll be able to save old meal plans for future reference. I hope it simplifies things for you.

14 thoughts on “How to Make Blackberry Syrup (Canning Recipe)”

  1. Is the end product thin? Or is it a little thicker, like a pancake syrup. If thin, how would you thicken it slightly?

    Reply
    • It is thinner than pancake syrup. If you would like to thicken it, you could use 1 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1/3 cup of water, and add to a pint of syrup in a saucepan. Cook and stir until mixture thickens. Note: I’m not a big fan of using cornstarch to thicken berry syrup. To me, it affects the flavor, which is why I purposefully left it out of this recipe. If you are trying to thicken a pint of syrup before serving, you could try heating it in a saucepan with additional sugar, maybe 1/4-1/2 cup. I’d be interested in knowing which method you try, and if either works well for you.

      Reply
  2. Sold on this recipe! Blackberries are my FAVORITE! And blackberry Italian soda? Mmm…. Try a little half and half on top to make it a cream soda. It’ll be the best thing you’ve ever tasted.

    Reply
  3. 5 stars
    Thanks for sharing your recipe for canned blackberry syrup. We have some wild blackberries on our farm and enjoy them every year. I’ll have to make some syrup to use on pancakes during the winter months.

    Reply
    • Yes, I hope you do find the time to make some canned blackberry syrup. It’s a great thing to have on a pantry shelf.

      Reply
  4. 5 stars
    Just this past weekend, I went to the alley behind my house to pick blackberries. I knew the long Indian summer was coming to an end, and rain will spoil them. All I got was two large yoghurt buckets, and I decided to make some jam with them. If the rain does not destroy what’s left of this year’s crop, I would love to make a little bit of syrup, too. I had to fight giant spiders to get to the biggest and ripest blackberries, though, haha!

    Reply
    • Good luck getting at the rest of the blackberries. It does take perseverance to pick them sometimes!

      Reply
  5. 5 stars
    Oh my goodness, you are so lucky that these little gems are so abundant where you live. Here in LA I would go completely broke if I would be buying enough blackberries to make a decent amount of syrup (at 4-5 bucks for a tiny container!). Still, if I ever score a good amount of berries from some source, I’ll make sure to go to this recipe, it seems really easy and I bet the syrup is delicious. It would be so good to sweeten my autumn teas with it.

    Reply
    • I wonder if anyone ever plants them on purpose? I hope you find a secret source somewhere!

      Reply
  6. 5 stars
    I love blackberries but hate the big seeds! This canned blackberry syrup will be great to have the taste of summer blackberries all year long! Thanks for sharing this with us!

    Reply
    • Sure! Yes, the seeds can be a problem sometimes. The fine-mesh sieve works wonders!

      Reply
  7. 5 stars
    I have an abundance of blackberries, so this recipe for canned blackberry syrup is just what I need. Thank you!

    Reply
    • You are very welcome! I always enjoy finding ways to use berries. Glad you liked this canned blackberry syrup recipe!

      Reply

Leave a Reply to Lisa Cancel reply

Recipe Rating




This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to content